Thursday, January 20, 2011

61 Hours of Winter Reading . . .

While travelling, I read Lee Child's 61 Hours, a paperback I'd given Paul for Christmas. While I can sympathize with Tiffany's frustration with this mystery (I know she expressed this somewhere recently, but I can't find that where to link to) in terms of its emphasis on plot and logistics, I'm enough of a Jack Reacher fan not to mind. That said, there seemed to be more technical detail, more stage-setting, to work through at the front end, before one was well and truly hooked, so I could see readers new to the series not bothering to persevere. For those whodo, though, especially those that know Reacher, his relationship with an old woman he helps guard is interesting for the way she challenges some of the truths about himself and his life that he holds to be evident. I wonder if Tiffany will agree that the same old woman could happily inhabit the pages of one of Kate Atkinson's Jackson Brodie mysteries. . . .

A good book to read in the deep cold of winter -- it will let you know how much colder it is elsewhere, and as you pull the blanket tighter, you'll be glad you're inside, by the fire, reading . . .

7 comments:

  1. Yes, I totally agree about the old lady - she was well drawn and his relationship with her was interesting. I did find that the plot - what are we counting down to? - pulled me through, and as I think I said earlier, I thought the weather was brilliantly described. It was the central character I found hard to believe/identify with, but perhaps that's partly to do with coming in at this point in the series ...

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  2. Mater, I'm a big fan of your other blog and just discovered this one. As a mom to two young kids (4 and 2), I've only just begun getting back into regular reading in the last 6 months or so. Though, it is a big challenge, I find that it helps to keep me from losing myself in being a mother and wife. I was always an avid reader as a child and thoughout my adolescence. My question to you is how do you make time for it with your busy schedule? And how did you make time for it as your kids were growing, particularly when they were young and in those demanding years?—Hopee

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  3. Tiffany: I think you probably do have to know Reacher better to relax into the book, and I don't think this is a good one to intro the series. Still, he's not to everyone's taste and it sometimes surprises me I like the books, action-oriented as they definitely are.
    Hopee: I'm so pleased to have you reading here and delighted with your question. Those years with little kids are such an upheaval to our lifetime patterns -- in delightful and difficult ways. I think it's really important to hang on to those key elements of the self -- and for me reading was always central -- not just to keep from losing oneself as mother and wife but also to be better in those identities. If you don't mind waiting a few days, I'd love to devote a brief post to answering your question. . . . stay tuned.

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  4. Mater, thanks for answering my post! I really appreciate your feedback and it is positive reinforcement for what I am intuitively feeling right now. What I'm reading between the lines of what you're saying is that we should hold on to whatever lifelines we can a time of upheaval. It sure is challenging, not only on the self but also on a marriage. I'm looking forward to reading your related post! — Hope (slip of the finger on the keyboard last time I typed my name! How embarrassing!)

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  5. Hope: It`s a tough gig, I agree! Big rewards, absolutely, but so demanding, and I don`t think our culture has enough experience to support women who want to mother their children well without losing themselves in the process. We`ll chat more once I get together a post answering your question . . .

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  6. This book is near, very near the top of my stack. I hope to get to it soon. You pique my appetite.

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  7. I got caught up in it,for sure . . .

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